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and visible systems that control our lives, and that is what is really with regards to our election system. we don't think about it. we think that the people so that the politicians, but actually in fact this matrix of election laws and systems and regulations shape who gets elected and the policy in the country and they determine or shape the level of mercury in the air that we brief, how many kids are in a classroom in the city of detroit, so they have a huge impact the we don't always appreciate. >> explain how that matrix works. where do they start and how far do they go? >> one unique thing about the united states is that we don't have a central system in terms of the election. we have got over 4,000 difrent election systems and the of different rules and laws and people who administer them said there isn't like one puppet master like some grand conspiracy. we've got all these different systems and the people that are familiar with the most common example of this which would be gerrymandering where politicians draw districts that favor them. congress is about a 14 or 15% approval rating o
. [applause] be mac thank you. there's a little less than two months before the election and in many ways this is the time the book was designed for because this are into these last two months, this is the election really get going. and to me, one of the great untold stories is not just obama versus romney. it is obama versus karl rove and he's in behind the scenes the whole time and he has put together over $1 billion that will be spent in these last two months. read new york here are not going to see much spent in the battleground states. and he's become king of the sub two. he has cover when you put this together money with money romney has raised the republican national committee is a total of about $1.8 billion. to put that in this, in no way, mccain had 375 million to spend, so this is a fact or a five. you'll start seeing it come out now. the other thing i want to discuss about him, is susie really? what does he do? is a political operative. how does he operate? what does he do? i talked to a couple services. one said there is a dark and terrible beauty about what he does. i have a
will be out on election day. >> we will hear about it when the election is over. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> let me start tonight to ask you come at you focus on nine women per know-how do so let them? >> -- how did you select them? we could have done more but with the confine of the book you could only do so much. democrats, republicans, diff erent ages. we knew on the basis of nine you could not make generalizations that were 100% certain. conclusions were hypotheses that other people run with. in order to make that hypothesis we needed a diverse group. >> we also included women that was the white house project so several with men that the white house project identified olympia snowe, kathleen sebelius sebelius, they want to consider the notion with her foundation that talk about women governors. that have been through the training through the pipeline. >> we also made the observation when a male is elected to the senator ship he is a hopeful scott brown was not even sworn been and scott brown 2012.com was already purchase. but so many women had been in washington as l
before the 2008 election, olympia snowe, kathleen sebelius were both in there, and we wanted to also consider this notion -- barbara lee who has been are sober years ago when he did the last round of madam president, six years ago with her foundation a doctor looking at women governors would want to look at some of the women governors who have been through some of barbara lee's training as a pipeline to the presidency. >> we also made the observation that when a male is elected to senator schiff, immediately he is cast as a future presidential hopeful. for example, scott brown hadn't even been sworn in yet in massachusetts, and the url scott brown -- or scott brown twinkled.com was already purchased. but so many women have been in washington for so many years as legislators and working on important work come and get their names never bubbled to the top. we were curious why not. >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? all three of you studied similar topics, but how did this book actually come about? >> your idea, ted. spent i guess it was my idea. i've been a political n
republican congress and fighting for it advantage in fighting to win the next election. that did not happen by accident. it did not happen by accident. i believe in the free enterprise system and i believe in incentives. they work. we have created a political system in which every incentive is to not cooperate and not compromise and not talk to somebody who has different ideas than your own. and you know, that's great. it's great to be pure on your principal. but we are a nation of 310 million people. and we have all different backgrounds and we have all different life experiences and we have different ideas that we feel strongly about. the way a democracy the size has to work. no matter how deeply you feel about one issue or another, at some point, you have to be able to sit down with someone who has a different idea and find where the overlap is, find where you can give a little and get a little and get the bridges built. and get the programs that a constitutional program that government is responsible for and make them happy. so let me tell you how we have created this. by the way, just
in the election of 1956. ben hogan for president. if we are going to have a golfer, let's have a good one. [laughter] eisenhower was franklin roosevelt's first choice to command the d-day invasion. eisenhower had three amphibious landings under his belt at that time. he got along well with the british and was churchill. that was very important and professor roosevelt there was no question he was going to pick eisenhower although he gave general marshal the opportunity to accept -- text to command the invasion if he wanted and eisenhower was characteristic, self disciplined, refused to express an opinion and president roosevelt selected ike. no one else could develop the western armies together as he could and his decision to land on d-day in spite of the weather caught the germans totally by surprise. they had no idea that innovation was coming. can you imagine 5000 ships in the english channel and the germans not knowing it because of the weather? that happened. the decision to want to take pairs with ike's decision, to take paris was his decision as well. they were to bypass pairs and c
of city government. i was chairing an elected commission in los angeles to revise the city charter, and i saw then that he not only was amazingly talented, but a reporter of enormous integrity. at one point he believed the los angeles times was not devoting nearly enough time to charter reform, it was important to the city, and according to los angeles weekly, he quit his position at the los angeles times in protest over this. he put his very job on the line because he believed in the importance of the story. he was then and is now an enormous star of the los angeles times. and as a result of that, the los angeles times decided to change it approach and gave tremendous attention to charter reform. i will always believe that charter reform succeeded in 1999 in los angeles because of what jim newton did and the covers of the l.a. times. a few years ago he mentioned to me he was planning to take some time off to do a biography of earl warren. i thought it was a great idea. and then i had the chance to read the book, and without a doubt it's the best judicial biography that i've ever read. so
in a different direction. after three straight losses in presidential elections between 19901998, they been in the practices of their old beliefs while continuing to espouse them in theory. these new democrats will say anything an objective that an immense commensurately requires them requires them to emulate republicans, particularly with respect to money grabbing on the fund-raising circuit. many of them left only a term or two because if people want a republican, they will vote for the real thing. what is developed in america over the last three decades is a 1.5 party system as democrats opportunistically cleave to the center, which in a relativistic universe of american politics keeps moving further to the right, and the quote. well, so far so bad. i relisted painted a rather dim canvas of what now comes to choose the political system of lincoln's last best hope for mankind. i do have some potential solutions because as you have no doubt heard, it is in my nature to be bloodlessly up be. [laughter] the solutions are also in the book. there rather than by continuing to talk, how about so
in the u.s. in washington d.c. to send a message. so for that i hope the united states whoever is elected will take a decision to stop the nuclear race today. something very interesting when you look at the arab leaders they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear so for that matter i think we would like to take action for the u.s. to sit idly by israel has to do it by itself. missiles fly in from iran, lebanon, and gaza would send hundreds of missiles but allowing iran to become nuclear to the option of fighting ourself, it is clear message of what to do with the redoubt the u.s. one of the main points of my book is the issue of the two-state solution. you must finish the conflict and it will be a palestinian state if obama adopted the approach to build up the palestinian state but in my book i prefer a new paradigm we have tried it for the last 20 years we tried with gaza and it did not help us as well. it should be a three state solution. i speak about jordan, egypt and israel. we should not be a palestinian state the tests with lap band and the gaza. islamic radical forces. >> guest: to
about what collective pardoning powers do. means the governments, the people rather their elected representatives have to sit down with government unions and bargain with them as equals over how do we spend taxes, how is the government going to be operated? unless the government unions agree the public policy can't be enacted so if you have school district selected overwhelmingly on a platform of ending tenure and evaluating teachers on the basis of performance and giving promotion to the best teachers in removing ineffective teachers from the classrooms at school board is not that the power in our democracy to enact that platform. they have to sit down with the unions in the unions say no and that is that. the school board doesn't have the power for these reforms. that is undemocratic and that is something the union movement in itself once recognize. a half-century ago in 1959 afl-cio executive council stated and i'm quoting directly, in terms of accepting collective bargaining procedures government workers have no right beyond the authorities of congress but since then the union
willingly lose an election if i could solve these problems. it is that serious. tim geithner, the treasury secretary, in the book is quoted thousands of words telling the president, you have got to do something about this problem. we have to fix it. you literally, it's not that we're going to close down the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing in excess, he tells the president of the united states if we default on this, on our obligations and our ious, we will trigger a depression worse than the 1930s. anybody here remember the 19 1930s depression? you probably don't. i don't. i was not born, but i've read about it. it was a calamity for the world. tim geithner said to the president what, if we default on this, if we do not solve this problem, we will have an economic catastrophe that will make the 2008 financial crisis a footnote in the history books. anyone remember the 2008 financial crisis? that's coming not from some columnist or journalist, that is
, the big change began in 1980 with the election of ronald reagan because he brought with him to washington a very underrated figure in the recent history, some i don't think this is due as an important area and that is edwin meese because he was first an advisor and then as attorney general said look, they're has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court of their needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was the agenda? expand executive power and attend to a system for americans from a speech that execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and above all, reverse roe v wade in the last months again to the abortion. a big part of the revolution was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted it to work on behalf of the agenda. word the best and brightest in your group? john roberts and samuel alito. in 1985 in a memo plotting the litigation strategy of the solicitor general's office, he wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v wade? later that y
the republicans are the or the democrats. in the last two elections, democracy and socialist party together brought under 40% that can bind the vote. an explosive party is the party called the cerise a party. it is a far left-wing party that is against all oesterle programs and wants to solve greece's problems they want to take wealth away from the greek rich. they got 27. the only reason that the government agrees now of the right is because of a law for the greece, under greek law, whatever party comes in first, i will take a step back. it has proportional representation. that the reserves a rule of comment. you should have the same percentage of delegates in congress that write the law. 18% of the people while party a, and it will come to deciding what laws get passed. they will effectively screwed that in which you would think of the idea. in european countries, we have torsional representation. you get a cut off of 5%. that is how many seats that you get. if you get 51% of the vote, you get it all and the 49% worked. by the way, we have had proportional representation in the united sta
is a state that is two to one democrat. so getting elected, vowing to be a penny pincher, spending my first time proving that i was a penny pincher beyond reproach and then getting reelected by a bigger margin the second time than the first time, i think -- i think that speaks to the fact that people really appreciate good stewardship of tax dollars. >> the libertarian party is often associated with changing the drug laws and you've advocated for that as well. >> changing the? >> drug laws. the >> has come since 1989 of advocated legalizing marijuana, controller cannot regulate, tax it. we had a tipping point with regard to marijuana and legalizing it. i think that colorado is going to do that. it's on the ballot in colorado this november, regulate marijuana like alcohol. i think it is going to pass. when it passes and if it doesn't pass the colorado come is going to pass the 50% of americans now say they support the motion. it is a growing number. it's a growing number because people are talking about the issue more than they ever have before, recognizing 90% of the drug problem is prohibi
foundation. we are in for a real treat. here we are approaching election. which pretended to be a water shed, recognized by both political parties as turning point. a change debate about the role of government, free market to the future trajectory of our nation. in that debate, campaign commercials and political rhetoric abound. sound bytes, daily reactions dominate the news cycle. luckily for us in the miss -- mist of this a serious thinker wrote a serious book. having been discovered by william f. buckley and grown up writing and reading for national review and overcome the education at harvard university and the upbringing in west virginia, he it a touring figure of the conservative movement. rightly sew. a professor of government the the clare month college. he's the coed or it with william f. buckley of keeping the tablet of modern american conservative thought. he is written extensively on american constitutionalism and political ideas. indeed the addition nat federalist paper the one published -- is the best selling edition in the united states. he can contributes regularly to the opi
, they actually do the opposite. they are short-term oriented to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't respond to the marketplace the way a business should. they have their own agenda in terms of those special interest groups and the like. the bigger they get from them were hardly due to the economy and the less chance that they have to improve your lot in life, as abraham lincoln put it. >> host: is reality a part of capitalism to smack it is the basis of capitalism. contrary to the hollywood cartoon character of business people rubbing their hands in glee at the misery of others, even if you lust for money, you don't get it unless you provide products or services that somebody else wants. so without us even realizing it, it enhances humanity. you have to create change and cooperation and you have to get people to work with you. you have to persuade people to buy what you're offering. in that sense, free markets open up for her creativity. anyone can go anywhere and do something. but by golly, you have a chance to do it. it breaks barriers between communities and ethnic gr
them in israel. and the values are democracy. we are following very carefully the elections here in the united states. and it's getting to be interested. i can tell you in the last three weeks it's become more interesting. but we do follow it, and we do love the american people and t american values. sometimes too much. for example, in the day of independence in israel, which is a big celebration in may, you will find people putting the israeli flag and the american flag. i don't like it. why people do it, because they do it because of the value and democracy of the american people. but one of my main points in my book is that israel is not america. even though we love america, we are not muck, and -- america, and we are not america because we cannot make a mistake. if israel makes mistakes, we cannot correct it. and we saw it in the past. and my main point in my book, that evil must take the decisions according to the interest of israel period, we do not have to think or to try to satisfy anyone even if it means telling to our allies to have the american president to the u.n., w
became. the big issue, big change began in 198 1980 that goes with the election of ronald reagan ronald reagan brought with them to washington a very underrated figure in a recent american history, somehow i don't think gets his due as an important person. that's edwin meese because edwin meese at first was in flash and then attorney general. said look, there has been a liberal agenda at the supreme court. there needs to be a conservative agenda at the supreme court. what was that agenda? expand executive power and end racial preferences, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere, and above all, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution was the arrival of washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda, who were two of the best and the brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 1970 -- in 1985, a memo at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eve
, i hope that the united states of america, and whoever will be elected, will take a leadership decision, maybe it's not popular that it will be a moral decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. and i don't know how many of you have followed the weekly reports, and what was written there, but something very interesting popped up from the report. when you go into look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today between the option of allowing iran to become nuclear, to the option of fighting ourselves, i t
fellowships of the hunting library in the colman center for writers and scholars and is an elected member of the american academy of arts and sciences. light is committed to doing the work of the public historian as well answer some numerous boards of museums and historical societies and is a member of the advisory board for the curators of the 9/11 museum. as i mentioned before, he has taught me so very much and served as one of my most frequent sources for my documentary, looking for lincoln, my book lincoln on race and slavery and for a new film project, the african-americans many rivers to cross. it is my great honor and privilege to present this evening the anisfeld-wolf book award for nonfiction to my friend and my teacher, david blight. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> my goodness. skip i actually just wanted to keep sitting there and let you keep going. i don't want to talk about the book. let's listen to skip. if i may borrow a word from isabella, suppose, what a beautiful word to start almost every line with. suppose there was a place that celebrated books, suppose there was a book award i
. what size do you wear? 14. [laughter] anna belle passed around fliers describing reagan's electives meant for distribution to the middle school kids. we've got every sport but swim team, said jeff square yus, who was on four of those team, counting golf. we need a swim team. anna belle said, you want to be on it? the bus pulled out of the lot. the kids bounced in their seats, away from class for an hour. they rode off toward middle schools they'd once attended on errands to convince at least a few that reagan high might have more to offer than tax cramming and the avoidance of getting stabbed. anna belle tucked a leg and surveyed her troop. the band kids had been an easy choice, the drum line in particular. they drew a crowd wherever they went from the mueller parking lot to formal competition. they'd been called up to play on the friday night lights tv show. still, jaqua rick us was the main attraction. on the football field, she stood out just by showing up. some college programs were looking at him, baylor and a couple of bigger ones too. as he told it, that had been his plan all
at all after political scientists say the time between election day in november and inauguration day is 11 weeks they are saying that is too short a time for a president to get ready. linda and some had two hours and 6 minutes from which he was sworn in on the plane on air force one and let's get airborne and landed in washington. he had to get off the plane ready to be president of the united states. to see him step in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and everyone of his major -- was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress, to see him get that program up and running and has it, ramming it through. to watch lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he not only knows all the levers to pull but has the will. in lyndon johnson's case almost vicious drive to do it, to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i do the research look what he is doing. look what he is doing here. i don't say i succ
's a personality meeting technology moment. for instance in the 1960 election that talks about the jfk and how -- telegenic he was an hard already been used by several presents beforehand that he had this unique temperament and look that really spoke well to television. i think you have a similar thing with the internet and barack obama it and other people have tried to harness the power of the internet to what extent they could but i think there is a reason why say will.i.am didn't make an music video about howard dean. it wouldn't quite be the same. also at the very heart of it, this is sort of a dangerous proposition. it seems very fun and happy and oh my god its punching easter bunny but when you apply this kind of thing to the presidency nothing other film is subject to the presidential records act so every scrap of everything and every time you swear because you're mad about something it's all in there. so i think at the very heart, that very thing you have to understand is unless everyone from the senior advisers down to the candidates and the president himself were in anyway nervous ab
he was the senior senator from maine and mitchell was the elected leader, said he was older and was sort of a junior. when he and kaelin get together, i don't know. but they work together very closely in the senate just like being on opposite sides of the aisle and this is a photograph that shows them in collaboration during the act when mitchell had first been appointed to the senate he had been named the secretary of state and mitchell was appointed to fill his vacancy in 1980. in his early senate career his campaign literature shows mitchell on election night in 1982 the first year that he actually ran for the seat appointed for it was a tough campaign and he came out on top and send letters from strong thurmond who at the time was the secretary and the senate congratulate senator mitchell on his selection of what was his first election. we continue to get materials from his office in the law firm in new york city, and it's still getting awards and generating material for his career and so they come to rest over time. in 1990 having just been elected the senate majority l
to because i think a lot of people that he was finished with the 08 election and here i thought you needed a second life. thank you. >> thank you. >> panelists include author melanie kirkpatrick and joseph kim, one of the people profiled in her book escape from north korea discuss the experiences of country. this event is about an hour for 10 minutes. hud >> after an welcome to theso hudson institute's book form to celebrate the publication of escape from the korea, the untold story of an underground railroad by senior i'm ken, president andceo of fellow like to welcome the audience watching at home and especially thank the friends at c-span for covering the event today. there were a couple of guests whom i would like to ak nog. -- acknowledge the counsel general of south korea and new york ambassador. i would like to -- [applause] i would like to acknowledge the presence of the japanese deputy counsel general in new york. [applause] in addition, i would like note the presence of several hudson institute trustees or vice chair, and the trustee jack david, as a special interest in the book
to paraphrase james' old saying in the election of 1992, it's the economy, stupid. it's the culture stupid. the culture of america is changing for the worse, and we see it in our terrible, competitiveness ratings, you know, with the foreign countries in math, science, ect. it's not hard to make chose changes. politically, it will be very difficult, but it's really quite cheap, and nobody ever talks about the kinds of things we have to do, and it's not putting more money into education, ect.; it's getting the kids to want to learn. if they want to learn, we could spend half of what we spend and we'll get better students. >> host: bill, thank you very much. michael, you start. >> guest: anybody who is concerned about american values and american culture should read "that used to be us" because there's an extensive discussion of both, and we do feel it over the last 20 years, some of the core values have eroded. in particular, there's now a greater emphasis on the short term than there used to be, and not as much emphasis as we need on the long term. there's no doubt that culture and values a
of the party that wins in a general election. the queen has a specific power under the constitution to be consulted and to encourage and to warn. she does that in all of her private audiences with the prime ministers and many other government officials, members of the clergy and members of the judiciary to come to her for completely confidential audiences which are extremely important to them. [inaudible question] >> well, the first constitution is so different from ours. underwritten, accumulation of laws and traditions. their subjects of the queen. that is what, you know, the term is. >> i need to ask, asking questions just temporarily, please stick around for more questions from the audience. c-span will be here shortly to continue. there will be taking questions year from that history and biography pavilion and also from national colors. please stay with us. we would love to have you continue. and if you have questions, we will be back with you in it slightly less than ten minutes. thanks so much for your patients. please stay with us, and please thank our author >> visit booktv
since this is an election year, hundreds and thousands and millions of people come in 11 states and the old confederacy from virginia to texas couldn't register to vote simply cause of the color of their skin. people stood in line. it took a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 more than four need to keep those in the but only about 16 those and were registered to vote. there was a county in my native state of alabama and the heart of the black belt. am i population was more than 80% but there wasn't a single registered black voters in the county. a little town of selma alabama 2.1 were registered to vote. people were beaten and jailed. on one occasion a man was asked to borrow another soap and count the number of jellybeans in a jar. there were african-american lawyers, teachers and doctors come college professors failing the test and had to pay a tax and we had to change that. hundreds had been arrested and jailed. my goal organization the student nonviolent coordinating committee better known as sncc. [applause] thank you. some of you remember. more than a
followed very carefully the election here in the united states, getting to be interesting. last week it became more interesting, what we do follow you. we do love the american people and the american values. sometimes too much. for example, in the day of independence in israel, a big celebration in may. you'll find people putting up the is reflected in the american flag i don't like. i put on my car only the israeli flag. but by people do? because they do it, the value of the democracy agenda can people. but my main point in the book, israel is not america. even though we love america, we are not america. we cannot make mistakes because if you make a mistake, you pay a price. which are able to correct it. if israel makes a mistake, we cannot correct it. we saw it in the past. my main point in my book that it shall make decisions according to the interest of israel, period, we do not have to think or to try to satisfy anyone, even if it means telling our allies or to the american president or the e.u. or to the u.n., we do not agree with you. and i will give you two examples. we are a
served on who had been in elective office. she had been majority leader of the arizona state senate and there is nobody there that has ever had to face the public and, you know, for some of them i'd sure that that is a good thing. but it's kind of a narrow professional biography that's pretty interesting. what that reflects is the current state of the confirmation process. presidents don't want to take a chance. how do you not take a chance? you get somebody that has already been acting as a judge and you get to look at how they have performed as a judge and a deal with legal materials and how they comport themselves and so on. that is a kind of very rough proxy for how they might be hit on the u.s. supreme court of course because you are found by the supreme court presidents and they cannot go off on their own frolic and once you are on the supreme court they'll pay homage to this notion you've heard starting to stand by the president, but that doesn't mean they have to. they can do what they call what the five votes to do. so a very sort of precedent balad lower-court judge doesn'
the president and i will of course vote for him in the election with a lifelong democrat i still remember her weeping denied roosevelt died. my mother just passed away from planning that hillary wasn't liberal enough. if i had voted for republican coming back from the grave and scold me like pineapple was. but i am disappointed that the president hasn't taken stronger steps to rid us of this mania of testing which ever since no child left behind has come into law is the kind of national psychosis, but there's something psychotic about it. it can't be numbered. it doesn't count. my father's psychiatrist use to take me to the back boards of mental hospitals in massachusetts and so many people on the most severe depression the only way they could ease their discomfort is by numbering everything. they would restlessly move object surrounded the table to get them in the pattern, and as i mentioned, some of the bureaucrats in washington maybe they would enjoy este in the recovery house to get over this numerical what action. this hoping of judging children and their teachers primarily on the basis
it is not a huge issue in general but a nuclear arms state during the election year. that we keep pushing under the rug there will be a day when north korea is free. it will come within those will realize there could have been more that we could have done in the is where were some anticipated we have overwhelming evidence that anybody could access. there was nothing during the holocaust many people set would have acted differently but today everybody watching this you can find concentration camps. joseph showed me the route he took every day. the fact that he can do that means we have overwhelming evidence of what is happening. but when you look bacteria has accomplished it can do extraordinary things going for the most impoverished country to the tenth largest in 60 years. with a korean-americans have accomplished. it never got that freedom the first half of the 20th century is old news but for north korea they are still stock. and we have a special responsibility when joseph first came in return can to workers restore. you don't think about this. just to buy him a snack. i don't know if he re
be governed through the most austere totalitarian means and once that collapsed the we have an elected government in tripoli it cannot project power beyond greater tripoli. you have a problem of governmental incapacity in libya that cannot deal with the crisis. egypt is different. egypt you have a country that has been an age old cluster of civilization for years. a cohesive community along the nile aware the government has greater bureaucratic and institutional power even under this new tenuis regime than the government in libya. the government in egypt has an army and police forces but the problem is political. can an islamic government take action against islamic them craters demonstrators. >> to take the other issue you are talking about this week, iran is a big theme in your book. you talk in one chapter about the iranian pet. the prime minister of israel sees iran very much in terms of the munich analogy. iran heading for having nuclear weapons capability that could threaten the existence of israel so the policy conclusions from that, you have a broader geographical and historica
and there was no pressure on that one. we are moving into another election about change. the central question is whether government is capable of contributing to positive change. the stimulus is exhibit a for the republican argument which is weird because it really ought to be exhibit a for the argument that it can. i realize i sound like an obama cheerleader. it is an extremely uncomfortable role for me and there's a theme for the end of the book where i am talking to joe biden who oversaw the stimulus. he let me sit in on a cabinet meeting devoted to the stimulus and basically giving me a hard time. i read all your articles. you are the only guy who wrote anything remotely positive. i am usually more of a downer than little mary sunshine. my friends will back me up on that. it is unusual for me. he started laughing at me. took him to bed and slept on them -- i didn't get into journalism to tell stories that joe biden would want to cuddle with. i followed the facts and my stories look blowing compared to the ridiculous thoughts ofs without the gotcha that passed for stimulus journalism. as i said about
person. someone who never sought elected officings and so he didn't do a whole lot to promote himself, although he lived a long life into the late 1800s, 1894 he died, but he retreated in the last 20 years of life into pretty much a private world and didn't promote himself. i also think that soon after the war was over, very soon after the war was over, much of the nation was guided by or inspired by a desire for reconciliation among whites, too bad for anybody else, and holt did not represent that point of view. he was very distressed at the repeated way the nation was unifieded and the former slaves' welfare was banded, and so he was a contrarian, and, again, didn't have a place in that narrative that was being created after the war, or a place for being celebrated in the way that the narrative was being developed after the war so he retreated, and he -- he was bitter, actually, at the end, but he sort of retreated to his private world, and he tried to reconstruct some relationships with family members, descendants of his own generation, nephew and niece in particular, and he clung
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